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Healthy Heart Reports

C-reactive Protein And Inflammation

Recent research shows that having a high C-Reactive Protein blood test means you are at increased risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke twice as much as having a high cholesterol. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) measures inflammation, part of the immune reaction that protects you from infection when you injure yourself. It causes redness, pain and swelling and can damage the inner lining of arteries and cause clots to break off from arteries and block the flow of blood.

C-Reactive Protein levels fluctuate from day to day, and levels increase with aging, high blood pressure, alcohol use, smoking, low levels of physical activity, chronic fatigue, coffee consumption, having elevated triglycerides, insulin resistance and diabetes, taking estrogen, eating a high protein diet, and suffering sleep disturbances, and depression. Alcohol can cause inflammation and raise C Reactive Protein. At this time the best ways we know to reduce C-Reactive Protein levels are exercise and a diet that includes omega-3 fatty acids. Statins appear to protect against inflammation as well as cholesterol, but they can cause nerve and muscle damage and deplete the body of co-enzyme Q10.

5/3/03

Copyright 2003 www.DrMirkin.com
Dr. Mirkin's opinions and the references cited are for information only, and are not intended to diagnose or prescribe. For your specific diagnosis and treatment, consult your doctor or health care provider.

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